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People Are Comforting Scared Shelter Dogs Instead Of Watching 4th Of July Fireworks

Everyone loves the 4th of July. Who doesn’t love seeing fireworks and cooking some hot dogs on the grill? Well, if you own a dog, you probably know they do not like fireworks at all. The loud booms and noises terrifies almost every dog I’ve ever known. Studies by the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals show more dogs run away in July than in any other month because of fireworks scaring them away.

Luckily, one shelter came up with a plan to help some of these homeless dogs relax a little bit this 4th of July.

People Are Comforting Scared Shelter Dogs Instead Of Watching 4th Of July Fireworks

“Calming the Canines,” at Maricopa County Animal Care and Control (MCACC), is a new Independence Day tradition — and it’s proving that nothing is as patriotic as kindness. People come to calm the scared dogs down by singing to them, reading to them and just sitting with them. This allows the dogs to focus on the humans instead of the fireworks going on outside.

People Are Comforting Scared Shelter Dogs Instead Of Watching 4th Of July Fireworks

“When they have these noise phobias, it’s horrible,” noted veterinarian Marty Becker said. “A lot of times these dogs will self-mutilate. I’ve had dogs come in that have run through a plate-glass window. They think they’re going to die, and when you think you’re going to die, you do crazy things.”

People Are Comforting Scared Shelter Dogs Instead Of Watching 4th Of July Fireworks

“It was overwhelming to see how the community responded,” Ben Swan, the shelter’s development director, said in a press release. “It really helped spread our message that MCACC is here to help.”

People Are Comforting Scared Shelter Dogs Instead Of Watching 4th Of July Fireworks

And people love helping out too. Last year, over 300 local residents showed up to help the Arizona facility.

People Are Comforting Scared Shelter Dogs Instead Of Watching 4th Of July Fireworks

“It was overwhelming to see how the community responded,” Ben Swan, the shelter’s development director, said in a press release. “It really helped spread our message that MCACC is here to help.”

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“Many participants developed lasting relationships with the shelter, returning to provide foster care, adopt a pet or volunteer,” the MCACC wrote.

This year, shelter staff hope that the kindness will spread even wider, and even more meaningful connections will be made.

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